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with the till look -- tillamook burn. never. we used to have a very high rate of employment, with a relatively high average, annual salary when the mills were operating. we no longer have mills. what in the hell are we doign to this -- doing to this state? >> do you want to share any thoughts on the east side forest plan my colleague has been trying to put together to get out of this deadlock? >> it all works soemtimes. -- sometimes. but every time that something gets going, it goes to the courts. we are stymied. >> thank you very much. whenever i am hiding in that area, you often see -- hiking in that area, you often see completely overgrown, second- growth forests that are not serving their purpose and are often a source of disease, a potential fire hazard. it is a lose-lose-lose situation. there are a number of things that we need to push forward on. one is the thinning which produces a steady supply of logs, better timber stands, and improves the ecosystem. nothing moves past in this world, but another piece was -- senator wyden and i thought to get money to help for us to thinning. a seco
will take a short break for lunch and at 1:30 p.m., we reconvened with panel 3 on the use of dispersants with three panelists. add to 30 5:00 p.m., panel four will focus on the future of onshore drilling, and we will have three panelists there. at 335 pm, panel 5 lil 0 -- focus on the response in the arctic. we will have five panelists. after a short break, we convene at 5:00 p.m. to begin the public comment period, and at 5:30 p.m., we will adjourn. any member of the public would like to submit a comment made do so via the web site at oilspillcommission.gov. we have a full agenda and we respect everyone's time. we asked all the panelists to please stay within the time limits in order to allow ample time for the commissioners to ask questions. there is a timekeeper right here in front who will monitor the time. we ask the panelists to please begin to summarize their remarks when they reach the timekeeper's one minute mark. i give control of the meeting to our cochairs, senator bob graham and the honorable william reilly. >> thank you. winston churchill described in event as not being the
, is the u.s. still making any use of military bases and oman as in the past? >> i think we have military cooperation with oman, as we do with many countries, but i will defer the specifics to the pentagon. >> do you have any comment on the new japanese foreign minister? will the secretary have a bilateral meeting with him next week? >> we appreciated his many contributions to the u.s.-japan alliance and his role as foreign minister and we look for to working with him in his new capacity as general secretary of the dpj, and we will continue to work closely with the government of japan and the foreign minister across a broad range of issues between our nations. i am confident there will be high level meetings with japan coming up next week, but i will defer it to announcements that others will make on specifics of the bilaterals. >> we were just told before you got up here you would be making the announcement. >> no, no, there are some meetings the secretary will have, some that the president will have. >> can you go through the secretary's meetings as they are scheduled? >> we are relucta
state. the q4000 is used to lift the blowout preventer. why are we using it? the reason we are doing it is because when it was brought and originally, it was to operate the manifold on the see that what -- seabed that allowed us to do this static -- excuse me, a dynamic attempt at the top killed. altman we did that by pumping mud and cement into that show client heard before that, we were having to kill the choke line with the q4000. it was never intended to be the primary lifting device. the reason we are using it is, on deck, it has the electrical connections and a computer that run the yellow pdod, which is the control pod that runs the hydraulic lines and vowels and operate the blowout preventer from the surface. we married the yellow pod with the q4000 at the start of the response. because of that, we are excepting some limitations on what they can do compared to what the "discover enterprise," can do. is the response of? >> yes. [unintelligible] do you see that as anything that might affect the response? >> i do not. >> thank you. >> i was wondering if you could talk about what
security. u.s. troops pulled out last summer. iraqi forces had moved into the lead with considerable skill and commitment to their fellow citizens. even as they continue to suffer terrorist attacks, security infancies have been near the lowest on record since the war began. iraqi forces had taken the fight to al qaeda. this year sell iraq called incredible elections i drew a strong turnout. a caretaker administration is in place. tonight i encourage the leaders to move forward with a sense of urgency in coming to form a government that is just representative and accountable to the iraqi people. there should be no doubt that the people will have a strong partner in the united states. going forward, and the transitional force of u.s. troops will remain in iraq with a different mission. they will support iraqi troops in targeted counter-terrorism missions and protecting our civilians. a consistent with our agreement with the government come on u.s. troops will leave by the end of next year as our military draws down, are dedicated civilians are moving into the lead to support iraq as a result
. >> in a few moments, and news conference on the u.s. attitudes towards muslims protocol in an hour, the state department briefing that included questions on plans to burn copies of the qur'an. -- poor run -- koran. . . >> we meet today to discuss what we consider to be an alarming trend and a rise in the bigotry in this country. it is the time that challenges americans to decide whether we are going to live up to our values, the values of religious freedom and tolerance that has been the hallmark of american society for so long. i feel very privileged and honored to have such distinguished faith leaders com heree today -- come today to assert their belief in the importance of filling the american promise and these principles. i am particularly grateful to my jewish colleagues who are very busy, entering a time of jewish holy days and have many things to do in preparation for that. i am very grateful for them, in particular, for joining us today. let me just say a few brief words about the climate that we find ourselves in today. i understand that there is a great deal of misunderstanding abou
the vice-president for foreign and defense policy studies. thanks a for joining us today. we are very proud to have senator lindsey graham here today. he will give a short talk this morning or this afternoon which will be followed by a session of "q&a" with the audience. after that, we will do a short and sweet roundtable, something we have not done in the past. no set piece presentations. i am pleased that we are able to have senator graham ought back here. he has really given it back one of the most interesting and well received talks here in many years last time he spoke. he has a very illustrious resume which is online at for you to read and its full form. he served for 6.5 years as an active duty air force lawyer. after leaving the air force in 1989, he joined the south carolina air national guard where he served until his election to the house of representatives in 1994. he serves as the south carolina state in the house of representatives since 2003. he was called to active duty in the first gulf war. he continues to serve in the reserves. he recently returned from reserve duty in af
money into the social security trust fund will require us to actually make some tough calls. and since this majority condemned us all the time for running -- spending too much money, then i think a good idea would be to go back to the budget of 2006. i know some are talking about 2008. we go back to that budget and i think that would help us maybe take care of the issue and give us a good start by being able to put all the social security tax money into the social security trust fund. now, the republican is so brilliant he told me we could never do that. i was shocked. why not? because the government would probably buy bonds with it and be the biggest bond holder, we could never allow that to happen. well, not really. we could create a treasury note that's interest-bearing. so it's not risky, it doesn't put the social security trust fund at risk. that money makes interest. and it's there and we stop having a ponzi scheme. a very simple idea. and a republican has proposed it. but when we were in the majority , earlier we didn't go for it, but i hope they will if we get the majority agai
. and anthony placido on the use of u.s. intelligence gathering. later religious leaders from the christian, muslim faith will talk about religious tolerance in the u.s. live coverage begins at 1:00 eastern. . >> is good to be in milwaukee. it is good to be here. i am almost home. [cheers and applause] i just hop on the '94 and i am home. [cheers and applause] its is good to be here on such a beautiful day. happy labor day, everybody. [cheers and applause] i want to say thank you to the milwaukee area labor council and all of my brothers and sisters in the afl-cio for inviting me to spend this day with you. [cheers and applause] this is a day that belongs to the working men and women of america. i want to acknowledge your president,g national presenc and a man who knows that a strong economy needs a strong labor movement. [cheers and applause] thank you to the president of the wisconsin afl-cio, the secretary of the treasure. [cheers and applause] happy birthday, sheila. [cheers and applause] i am proud to be here with our secretary of labor, a daughter of a union member, held the soleus, a
's clear that many of us, an many in our audience are just coming off of summer vacation. yesterday at the state department, felt a little bit like the first day of school. everyone showed up for our morning meeting, and looking a lot healthier than they did when they left. and it is also obvious that there isn't any rest for any of us. the events of the past few weeks have kept us busy. we are working to support direct talks between the israelis and the palestinians, and nexteek, i will travel to egypt and jerusalem for the second round of these negotiations. in iraq, where our combat mission has ended, we are transferring and transitioning to an unprecedented civilian-led partnership. we are stepping up international pressure on iran to negotiate seriously on its nuclear program. we are working with pakistan as it recovers from devastating floods and continues to combat violent extremism an of course, the war in afghanistan is always at the top of our minds as well as our agenda. now, none of these challenges exist in ice lags. -- isolation. consider the middle east peace talks. a
week we have legislation. it is important for us to make things here in america. we have always been good at that. in making it in america, it lets people make it in america. maybe by now you may know that the senate is passing the small business credit bill. i understand it was imminent when we came down here. when they do, this legislation will help to create 500,000 jobs. it will reduce taxes is for small businesses. s and as we get the bill, -- we think we have some better ideas. the republicans in the senate have held it up. some of these issues will have to be in future legislation because small businesses cannot wait another day for this to be passed. i think it is important to know that august is officially over. in the first eight months of this year, the economy has produced more private-sector jobs than the eight years of the bill should ministration. more private sector jobs created in the first eight months of 2010 banned in eight years of the bush administration. we are here to preserve social security, tax cuts for the middle-class, we are not going back. we are here t
understand it will prohibit us from having human access to lower earth orbit on our own rockets and spacecraft until the private aerospace industry is able to qualify their hardware underdevelopment as rated for human occupancy. i support the encouragement of newcomers to provide lower-cost access to space. but having cut my teeth in rockets more than 50 years ago, i am not confident. the most experienced rocket engineers with him i have spoken believe that it will require many years and substantial investment to reach the necessary level of safety and reliability. if these experts are correct, the united states will be limited to buying passage to the international space station from russia and will be prohibited from flying to other destinations in lowercase earth orbit or destinations in the outer space frontier. -- in the lower space-b sorbate or destinations in the outer space frontier. i believe that if the national space plan is subject to the normal review process of this congress, the aerospace industry and the reliable experts that we know in the military and the aeros
all of you for joining us today. we are here to launch negotiations to settle the israeli-palestinian conflict. i note that getting everyone at this table was not easy. we understand the suspicion and skepticism that so many feel, born out of years of conflict and frustrated and hope. a tragic act of terror on tuesday and the terrorist shooting yesterday or additional reminders of the human cost of this conflict. but by being here today, you each have taken an important step towards freeing your people from the shackles of a history we cannot change. moving towards a future of peace and dignity that all you can create. so thank you. thank you for your courage and your commitment. i also want to recognize the support of egypt and jordan, which have long been crucial partners for peace. we appreciate the support of the arab league. i also wish to thank former prime minister tony blair, the special representative of the quartet, for his leadership and ebert. mr. blair's work in support of the institutional and economic development of the palestinian people is critical to the
freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 million each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. according to the g.a.o., 8% of the service members let go under don't ask, don't tell held critical occupations defined as services such as interpreters, 3% had skills in an important foreign language such as arabic, farsi or korean. more than 13,000 troops have been dismissed from the military simply because of their sexual orientation since president clton signed this law in 1993. mr. president, soci
. to us your thoughts about a story line of 1994 versus -- give us your thoughts on the story line of 1994 versus 20103 how can democrats governor's mitigate what many are talking about as a wave election? >> first of all, it is a different year, by definition -- i will start with that fact. there are clearly parallels to 1994, and i think there are pretty serious the distinctions. it seems that the series distinctions are that we democrats were asleep at the switch in 1994. we were complacent, we or smog, and to put it bluntly -- we were smug, and to put it bluntly, we were again. that is not the case today. we have been on red alert for a long, long time. no. 2 is that the republicans were identified in 1994. you mentioned this. they were unified in 1994. people forget the contract with -- some of us call it the contract on america. dee dee and i were talking about that. the white house was pretty smug about that. "no one is going to listen to that." newt gingrich, think of him what you may, and we have a lot of him -- he had atampa - lot of thoughts. the tea party has a downside for us
you can use it on current employees, legacy employees so someone decides i want to clean it up. i have someone who has been five or 10 years, i want a legal work force and run their names through e-verify. why not? why not give the employers a tool? why not let them use e hifere verify with a prospective employee with a legitimate job offer. we have that under a drug testing law in iowa. if you show up and you want a job, go through all of the hoops and they can say to you, i have gone through all the hoops, you have to take a drug test before we can put you to work. that's what we do in iowa. no complaints, no lawsuits. and i encourage them to do that. we should be able to provide as employers an illegal-free workplace so modernizing e-verify so it can be used on current legacy employees and with a legitimate job offer is a legitimate thing to do. and the third component we need to do, madam speaker, out of this, is we need to clarify wages and benefits to illegals are not deductible for federal income tax purposes and doing that allows the i.r.s. to run the social security numbers an
for fresh apples, and they already produce over half of the world apples. if the u.s. is starved for labor, the chinese are ready to step in. in the face of a crisis, retrieving lost production will not happen quickly. average profitability does not really give a proper return given the risk that we take. for most of us, the reasons we stated our not economical. a major live goal for me is to provide jobs to as many people as possible. i am compelled to be able to pass on our farm to someone who will take it. labor shortages are not going to find me a willing buyer. it is a serious economic problem that congress has not addressed for far too long. now is the time. i am extremely supported -- supportive of this legislation. comprehensive reform may be too politically charged right now. please focus on agricultural jobs and get it passed. >> good morning. i would like to thank the chairman and ranking members of the committee for holding this hearing. i am the president of the united farm workers of america. joining me today are five farm workers. i would like to ask them to stand up. isabel
in one million foreigners a year into our country legally. nobody can match us. nobody can come close in the entire world. the united states opens our doors to a million people to follow the rules and come into this country. yes, you can call it compassion, but it is random compassion. who said these people, determined by the white house, are more deserving of compassion than these people over here because we've got, according to most of the estimates, between 12 million and 20 million of these people in our country. so, why -- who decides and who picks those 17,000? and are we starting a policy that everybody that's awaiting a hearing in a immigration court will just be excused? is that the new policy? so 17,000 is just a start? i don't know, we don't have an answer to that. but the real question we have to be concerned about is, who made the executive branch so independent to operate that they can shut down things like drilling in the gulf and turn loose people who have pending court cases on their say-so? without any consultation or action by the legislative branch of the governmen
nuclear arms reduction treaty. >> with the house and senate back in session, follow congress using the c-span 2 libraries -- using the c-span video library. it is a great resource for anyone who uses the library. >> the imam leading the effort to build a summit center near ground zero says he is surprised by the controversy surrounding the plan. from the scalp -- from the council on foreign plans in new york city, this is one hour. >> good morning. people, please take your seats. welcome to the council on foreign relations. my name is richard hoss and i am the president of this organization. today, as you all know, we are hosting feisal abdul rauf, who is the founder and ceo for the american society for muslim advancement. he is also the imam, which i expect you all know, for the mosque here in new york city. that is, however, only part of who we is. he is the founder and chair of the cordova initiative dedicated to building bridges between the muslim and non-muslim world. he is also essential to plans for the building to the new islamic community center to be built adjacent to ground ze
of paperwork and record-keeping for small businesses, $48.72. the use of clear, easy-to-understand language in government paperwork will substantially reduce burdens on small businesses and save taxpayers millions of dollars. . millions of dollars. it will require federal government to use plain communications forms and public distributed documents, writing in a manner that follows the best practices of plain language writing. using these complex forms, letters imposes unnecessary hardships on american citizens and replacing them with plain language will improve service to the public, save time that agencies currently spend answering questions about what documents mean and make it easier to hold agencies accountable for their work. this will make it easier for americans and small businesses to work and understand their government. i thank my colleagues on both sides of the aisle who join me today for standing up for plain language and plain writing and standing up for effective communication with our constituents and standing up for small business owners and in standing up for the taxpayers
% of all tolls paid nationwide, even though staten island represents less than .16% or 1/600th of u.s. population. these situations take into account the tolls with the residential discouldn'ts -- discounts in effect. but my district is not unique. many other states and localities grant discounts to captive toll players, including the massachusetts turnpike, the sumner and ted williams tunnels in boston, the marine parkway and cross vets parkway in queens, the bridge in the hudson valley of new york, the delaware bay bridge, the rhode island turnpike and the new port bell bridge in rhode island, just to name a few. in the last few years, many of these discount programs have come under attack in the ports. last october in a case entitled sullivan versus the new york throughway authority, they held that toll discounts for residents of towns bordering the tollway may be unconstitutional. the plaintiffs claimed the residential toll discount tolls may be a dormant clause violation. the second circuit court demanded and reinstated the action which will must've forward. h.r. 4960 provides ex
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21